Louise Kane

Louise Kane, Ph.D.

Biography

Louise Kane is Assistant Professor of Global Modernisms. Her research is interdisciplinary and comparative in its focus on the literary, historical, and sociological contexts of transnational modernism, particularly in relation to little magazines and periodicals. Her work has been published in The Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, Literature and History, and The Space Between: Literature and Culture 1914-1945. Recent publications explore representations of shell shock and trauma in WWI-era medical journals and reading world cinema periodicals through digital humanities approaches. She is Director of the externally-funded "Literature the Consoler: Modernism, Medical Humanities, and Mental Health" research project and an Editor of The Journal of Wyndham Lewis Studies. Dr. Kane teaches courses in world literature, literary modernism, modern Asian fiction, literature of the Global South, and literary theory. She is interested in supervising students working on lesser-studied modernist figures and movements, such as Sui Sin Far, Borges's ultraísmo, or Japanese dōjinshi


Education

  • Ph.D. in English Literature from De Montfort University
  • B.A. in English Language and Literature from University of Oxford

Research Interests

World Literature 1890-Present; Literary Modernism; Little Magazines and Periodical Studies; Global Anglophone Literatures; Interdisciplinary Approaches; Asian American Literature; British Literature 1900-1950; Caribbean Modernism; Digital Humanities; Medical Humanities; Holocaust Studies/ Literature; Translation Studies

Awards

  • Literature the Consoler: Modernism, Medical Humanities, and Mental Health Research Project (funded by the Florida Humanities Council and NEH, 2019-20). 
  • Professor of the Year Award (Apr. 2018)  Golden Key International Honour Society (CCGA Chapter)
  • Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)-funded PhD Studentship, De Montfort University (2010-13)
  • Shelley Mills Essay Prize for Shakespeare Studies, University of Oxford (2009)
  • Wade-White Scholarship, University of Oxford (2007)
  • Dorothy Whitelock Prize for Old English Studies, University of Oxford (2007)
  • Oxford Opportunity Bursary, University of Oxford (2006-9)

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
20437 ENG4832 Scholarly Editing & Publishing Web-Based (W) Unavailable

This exciting course teaches you editing skills for a wide variety of contexts, including academic and scholarly books and journals, proofreading, and copediting. You'll also learn to liaise with authors and fact check. Assignments will be customized according to your individual interests. 

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
93559 ENG3831 Intro to Editorial Professions Web-Based (W) Unavailable

This course introduces you to Scholarly Editing and Publishing principles. Using real-life examples of journal articles and books, and held in conjunction with the James Joyce Literary Supplement, this course will help you to learn how to edit, proofread, and organize publications, learning valuable skills that will give you a taste of the sorts of tasks you would undertake in careers in publishing or editing.

92838 LIT3833 Modern Asian Literature Web-Based (W) Unavailable
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61254 LIT4244 World Authors Web-Based (W) B Unavailable
This class can apply as a "major author" toward the literature track requirements. It is also designated as "diversity".

LIT 4244 for summer 2022 focuses on author Merle Collins.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11320 ENG6078 Contemp Movements Lct Theory Face to Face (P) M 06:00 PM - 08:50 PM Unavailable

ENG6078 Contemporary Movements in Literary Cultural and Textual Theory

 

This course introduces you to literary theory as it has evolved from the mid-1900s to the present. Working with a variety of contemporary critical movements, from postcolonial theory to disability studies, we will explore a range of interdisciplinary texts and consider the role of different approaches to contemporary print cultures. 


20199 LIT3714 Literary Modernism Web-Based (W) Unavailable
LIT3714 Literary Modernism

This course explores some of modernism's best-known writers through the medium of the little magazine. Studying a range of periodicals from the early 20th century, we examine how figures like Hemingway, Stein, McKay, Williams, Loy, and Pound used little or "small" magazines as expressive, alternative forms of publication through which they shared their unique forms of modernist experiment. We begin by looking at American and European magazines before expanding our focus to read magazines from places like Japan, the Caribbean, Russia, and other diverse global locations. These readings ask us to consider how magazines were key agents in the development of expatriate literature, the Harlem Renaissance, and transnational forms of literary modernism that pose important questions about nationhood, gender, race, and identity. Assignments incorporate Digital Humanities tools for "mapping" modernism through computational and statistical, a special set of workshops on how to conduct archival research, and the opportunity to edit and produce your own literary magazine. 
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
92973 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Web-Based (W) Unavailable
ENG3014 Theories and Techniques of Literary Study

In this online Literary Theory based course you’ll learn new and exciting ways to approach and explore literary texts: from early philosophical approaches to literature and society, through to approaches grounded in Formalism, Structuralism, and Poststructuralism, and postcolonial, Feminist, and queer theory. We go ‘back to basics’, so no prior knowledge of literary theory is necessary. We learn how to apply these theories to four primary texts: Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, "Sweat" by Zora Neale Hurston, William Carlos Williams' poetry, and The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. Assignments are geared toward gaining employment in a wide range of industries and are interdisciplinary in their incorporation of undergraduate research grounded in rapidly expanding research fields like Digital Humanities and Disability Studies. 

92976 LIT3835 Trans Modern Chinese Novels Web-Based (W) Unavailable
LIT3835 Translated Modern Chinese Novels
Focusing on the post-1800 period, this course introduces you to writing from a range of Chinese authors. Covering Gong'an ‘crime case’ novels, travel writing, and Mandarin Ducks and Butterflies fiction, the course takes you through some of the key movements in Chinese literary culture, including the New Culture movement, and asks you to compare and contrast writers and styles through a range of interdisciplinary assignments. 
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50597 ENG3014 Theories and Tech of Lit Study Web-Based (W) B Unavailable
ENG3014 Theories and Techniques of Literary Study

In this online Literary Theory based course you’ll learn new and exciting ways to approach and explore literary texts: from early philosophical approaches to literature and society, through to approaches grounded in Formalism, Structuralism, and Poststructuralism, and postcolonial, Feminist, and queer theory. We go ‘back to basics’, so no prior knowledge of literary theory is necessary. We learn how to apply these theories to four primary texts: Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, "Sweat" by Zora Neale Hurston, William Carlos Williams' poetry, and The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. Assignments are geared toward gaining employment in a wide range of industries and are interdisciplinary in their incorporation of undergraduate research grounded in rapidly expanding research fields like Digital Humanities and Disability Studies. 

Updated: Feb 11, 2022